Since 2015, DHF has raised over $6 million and has funded 30 cutting-edge research studies that are changing the future of digestive health.

US News Health: How to Eat (and Exercise) to Get Six-Pack Abs featuring Digestive Health Center Dietitian Holly Herrington

To develop six-pack abs, start by cutting down on calories and refined sugar. While Olympians and pro athletes developed their physiques by eating well and investing countless hours to working out, lifting weights and doing sit-ups and crunches, you could pick up a six-pack just by eating the right foods, as many articles and videos suggest. The reality isn’t that simple, experts say. “Genetics is an unchangeable factor that affects your ability to develop a six-pack, says Holly Herrington, a registered dietitian at Northwestern Medicine Digestive Health Center in Chicago. “We get things from our families,” including our musculature and build.”

Better Makers: Digestive Health Foundation Gala Raises a Record-Breaking $2.41 Million

On Saturday, June 9, more than 400 guests attended the Digestive Health Foundation‘s 3rd Annual Gala and raised $2.41 million to help patients and families at the Northwestern Medicine Digestive Health Center affected by digestive disease.

Women’s Health: I Got My Poop Tested – Here’s What It Told Me About My Health featuring DHC physicians Dr. Stephen Hanauer and Dr. Emanuelle Bellaguarda

I think we can all unanimously agree that, while doctors are totally necessary, doctors’ appointments can seriously be a PIA. Let’s take my own health, for example: I’ve been having some—er, plumbing—issues for a while now (okay, fine, I’ve had ’em forever). To put it bluntly: I poop a lot (three to four times a day) and it’s very soft—sometimes even liquid. (In retrospect, I should have seen a doctor way before this point. Hindsight is 20/20.) So, when I heard about SmartGut, an at-home test by a company called uBiome that promises to test your microbiome (a.k.a., that colony of microbes living inside your gut right now) through a stool sample, I decided to try it.

AARP: When Heartburn is Linked to Cancer featuring thoracic surgeon David Odell

Esophageal adenocarcinoma — cancer of the lining of the soft tube that delivers food and drink from the mouth to the stomach — has increased sevenfold since the early 1970s. It’s one of the fastest-growing issues we have in our population,” says David Odell, assistant professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, thoracic surgeon at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and lead investigator on a study of esophageal cancer funded by the American Cancer Society.

Our investments in groundbreaking medical research are already changing lives. From software that empowers adolescents in their transition to adult care to an innovative esophageal endoscopy technique, our exciting research is making a difference for patients and families living with digestive disease. Read more HERE.

Our Research

Our Science Advisory Council

Dr. Hanauer is Immediate Past President of the American College of Gastroenterology and founding co-director of the Digestive Health Center.

Stephen B. Hanauer, MD

Read his full profile

Dr. John Pandolfino is a Professor of Medicine, as well as Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Northwestern Medicine.

John E. Pandolfino, MD

Read his full profile

Dr. Strong is founding co-director of the Digestive Health Center. His practice focuses on colon and rectal cancer, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and minimally invasive surgery.

Scott A. Strong, MD

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